Archive for Chanticleer

Winterthur Part 1: Late Winter 2013

Posted in bulbs for shade, garden to visit, Shade Gardening, Shade Perennials, snowdrops, winter, winter interest with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 22, 2013 by Carolyn @ Carolyns Shade Gardens

Carolyn’s Shade Gardens is a retail nursery located in Bryn Mawr, PA, specializing in showy, colorful, and unusual plants for shade.  The only plants that we ship are snowdrops and miniature hostas.  For catalogues and announcements of events, please send your full name, location, and phone number (for back up use only) to carolyn@carolynsshadegardens.com.  Click here to get to the home page of our website for catalogues and information about our nursery and to subscribe to our blog.

Crocus tomasinianus In early March, the courtyard behind the house at Winterthur is completely filled with snow crocus, C. tomasinianus. It is worth visiting in late winter just to see this sight.

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Each year I choose an outstanding Philadelphia (Pennsylvania, US) area garden to profile through out the seasons. There are so many amazing gardens in the Delaware Valley that I will never run out of choices. It is more a case of which wonderful garden to choose. In 2011 to 2012, I visited the enchanting pleasure gardens at Chanticleer. To see those posts, click here. In 2012 to 2013, I focused on the diverse and magnificent gardens and conservatories at Longwood. To see those posts, click here. For 2013 to 2014, I have chosen the elegant former estate of collector and horticulturalist Henry Francis du Pont located in Delaware just over the Pennsylvania line and called Winterthur.

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WinterthurThe Winterthur house holds the premier collection of American decorative art. For scale, look at the two people on the right side of the photo just beyond the path.

Henry Francis du Pont (1880 to 1969) was a voracious collector of American decorative art for his home and of plants from all over the world for his garden. He had a lot of space to work with as the house has 175 rooms and the garden is 1,000 acres, 60 of which he landscaped with naturalistic plantings. About 60 years ago du Pont opened the house and gardens to the public, fulfilling his wish that:

the Museum will be a continuing source of inspiration and education for all time, and that the gardens and grounds will of themselves be a country place museum where visitors may enjoy as I have, not only the flowers, trees and shrubs, but also the sunlit meadows, shady wood paths, and the peace and great calm of a country place which has been loved and taken care of for three generations.

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WinterthurThe paths leading from the visitor’s center to the house and gardens meander through the magnificent trees.

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The “peace and great calm of a country place” is what draws me to Winterthur again and again for the garden is not a botanical collection or a display garden in the usual sense. But rather, as the website states, “an artistic composition that captures a significant period in the history of American horticulture.” It is carefully maintained and preserved to allow visitor’s to enjoy the landscaped gardens as Henry du Pont designed them as well as the peaceful vistas that he carefully incorporated into his designs. Yet it does so with none of the rigidity and dated feeling of many historic gardens. The experience is as fresh and enjoyable as if du Pont himself were giving you a tour of his own backyard, albeit a very large one!

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DSCN9477Another view of the house in winter.

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This post shows photos from my visit to Winterthur for their annual snowdrop event, this year on March 9 (for more information on that event, click here). I apologize for the delay, but I have been so busy with my nursery that I just found time to sort through these images. I also thought that pictures of snowdrops and other winter bulbs might really stand out right now when other blogs aren’t posting them anymore. Most of the plants shown are in the area of the March Bank at Winterthur, which contains the premier collection of naturalized snowdrops and other winter interest bulbs in the U.S.

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Galanthus at Winterthurnaturalized snowdrops

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It is very difficult to give readers an idea of the massive amounts of snowdrops, aconite, crocus, glory-of-the-snow, snowflakes, adonis, and other winter bulbs at Winterthur. The plants are so small that once you back up to show a large area, they disappear into the leaf litter (at least using my camera, which is much better for macro shots). You will just have to take my word for it that in person the sweeps of bulbs are breath-taking and unparalleled.

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Eranthis hyemalisWinter aconite with snowdrops in the background.

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Winterthuraconites, snowdrops, and crocus

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Adonis amurensisAmur adonis

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Leucojum vernumspring snowdflake

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Winterthuraconite, snowdrops, and snowflakes

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Galanthus and Eranthissnowdrops and aconite

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Winterthursnowflakes and aconite

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WinterthurMarch Bank

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Galanthus elwesiiMost of the naturalized snowdrops are the giant snowdrop, G. elwesii.

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Galanthus elwesiiA particularly lovely clump of giant snowdrops with many more (plus a photographer) on the March Bank.

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Galanthus nivalis 'Vidirapice'green-tipped snowdrops

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Crocus tommasinianusSnow crocus growing in the grass courtyard behind the house.

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Crocus tommasianusIt is much easier to photograph the snow crocus set off by the grass. However, all the bulbs in this post appear through out Winterthur in the same massive quantities and are just as awe-inspiring as the crocus portrayed here.

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I hope you enjoyed Part 1 of my year of Winterthur posts, out-of-season though it may be. If you are local, mark your calendars for March 1, 2014, so you can see this wondrous display for yourself. In the meantime, it is finally summer and my nursery is closed. I will be posting on the blog but less frequently. On Thursday I am off to San Francisco for the 2013 Garden Blogger’s Fling. Enjoy your summer.

Carolyn

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Carolyn’s Shade Gardens is a retail nursery located in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, U.S., zone 6b. The only plants that we mail order are snowdrops and miniature hostas and only within the US.

If you are within visiting distance and would like to receive catalogues and information about customer events, please send your full name and phone number to carolynsshadegardens@verizon.net. Subscribing to my blog does not sign you up to receive this information.

Nursery Happenings: The nursery is closed and will reopen in the fall around September 15. Have a great summer.

Facebook: Carolyn’s Shade Gardens has a Facebook Page where I post single photos, garden tips, and other information that doesn’t fit into a blog post. You can look at my Facebook page here or click the Like button on my right sidebar here.

Notes: Every word that appears in orange on my blog is a link that you can click for more information. If you want to return to my blog’s homepage to access the sidebar information (catalogues, previous articles, etc.) or to subscribe to my blog, just click here.

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Chanticleer in Winter: Texture

Posted in garden to visit, landscape design, winter, winter interest with tags , , , on January 28, 2012 by Carolyn @ Carolyns Shade Gardens

Carolyn’s Shade Gardens is a retail nursery located in Bryn Mawr, PA, specializing in showy, colorful, and unusual plants for shade.  The only plants that we ship are snowdrops and miniature hostas.  For catalogues and announcements of events, please send your full name, location, and phone number (for back up use only) to carolyn@carolynsshadegardens.com.  Click here to get to the home page of our website for catalogues and information about our nursery and to subscribe to our blog.

Chanticleer’s Teacup Garden in May

Chanticleer is a unique public garden in Wayne, Pennsylvania, U.S., which I have profiled in three previous articles.  The first, Chanticleer Part 1: A Pleasure Garden, gave an overview of this one-of-a-kind horticultural destination.  The second, Chanticleer Part 2: Garden Seating, focused on the huge variety of thoughtful seating areas in the Chanticleer gardens.  The third, Chanticleer Part 3:  Through the Seasons, showed the gardens as they evolve through spring, summer, and fall.


The Teacup Garden in January

To complete my series on Chanticleer through the year, I received special permission to visit the garden during the winter months when it is closed to the public.  As you can see from the photo above, all the “toys” are put away and most of the flowers and foliage are gone.  But the minute I stepped into the garden, the word TEXTURE appeared before me as if it was outlined in neon lights.  I have never had such an exciting visit to this garden because I saw it in a whole new way, and I hope I can communicate that to you.

I always admire the elegant mature trees when I visit, but without their leaves or any flower gardens to distract me, they really stood out.

Texture was also provided by smaller plants, but not the way I expected:

 





Hardscape, always a huge part of Chanticleer’s elegance and beauty, really dominated my visit:





The attention to detail in the paths, always a hightlight for me, was easier to see and appreciate:

I decided not to add captions to the photos in this post, but if you want more information just run your cursor over the photo.  The location of the Lady in the Lake is secret so you will have to find her for yourself.

I want to thank Bill Thomas, Chanticleer’s Director, for making this visit possible, Fran DiMarco, Administrative Assistant, for arranging it, and Joseph Henderson, Horticulturalist, for providing some needed conversation in the sun so I didn’t freeze to death.  I have been promised a visit in the snow, and I might take them up on it if we ever get any of the white stuff.

Carolyn

Calendar:  If you would like to look at my photos all year round, please consider buying my 2012 calendar, available worldwide, 20% off through 2/3/12.  For details, click here.

Facebook:  Carolyn’s Shade Gardens now has a Facebook page where I can post photos and information that don’t fit into a blog post.  You can look at my Facebook page here or click the Like button on my right sidebar here.


Notes: Every word that appears in orange on my blog is a link that you can click for more information.  If you want to return to my blog’s homepage to access the sidebar information (catalogues, previous articles, etc.) or to subscribe to my blog, just click here.


Nursery Happenings: To view the
2012 Snowdrop Catalogue, click here. I am currently accepting orders—snowdrops are available mail order.

Look for an exciting new hellebore offering in February 2012.  If you are within visiting distance and would like to receive catalogues and information about customer events, please send your full name and phone number to carolynsshadegardens@verizon.net.  Subscribing to my blog does not sign you up to receive this information.

Chanticleer Part 3: Through the Seasons

Posted in Fall, garden to visit with tags , , , on November 29, 2011 by Carolyn @ Carolyns Shade Gardens

Carolyn’s Shade Gardens is a retail nursery located in Bryn Mawr, PA, specializing in showy, colorful, and unusual plants for shade.  The only plants that we ship are snowdrops and miniature hostas.  For catalogues and announcements of events, please send your full name, location, and phone number (for back up use only) to carolyn@carolynsshadegardens.com.  Click here to get to the home page of our website for catalogues and information about our nursery and to subscribe to our blog.

Close up of the teacup fountain in fall.

Chanticleer is a unique public garden in Wayne, Pennsylvania, U.S., which I have profiled in two previous articles.  The first, Chanticleer Part 1: A Pleasure Garden, gave an overview of this one-of-a-kind horticultural destination.  The second, Chanticleer Part 2: Garden Seating, focused on the huge variety of thoughtful seating areas in the Chanticleer gardens.  This post will show some of Chanticleer’s gardens as they evolve through the seasons, highlight some additional “hardscape” features, and focus on the attention to detail in one tiny garden that peaks in the fall.

The Teacup Garden through the seasons: clockwise from top, spring, summer, fall.  I highly encourage you to click on any photo to enlarge it for more detail especially the collages.

I hope that my first two posts have inspired you to visit Chanticleer.  However, if you live in the area, it is well worth visiting several times a year.  As you can see from the photos of the Teacup Garden above, the changes in some of Chanticleer’s gardens are very dramatic.  And even the less dramatic evolution of other areas makes each visit feel unique.  Here are a few more gardens from spring through fall:

Entrance courtyard: clockwise from left, summer, spring, fall.  The lavish and very colorful plantings in this area, where visitors check in, often have a tropical theme.

The gardens above the pond and below the ruin: clockwise from left, summer, spring, fall.

View of the Serpentine Garden from the gravel gardens below the ruin: clockwise from top, fall, summer, spring.  Although the changes are more subtle, they are no less beautiful.

Another more subtle change in the area below the ruin and above the Stream Garden: top summer, bottom fall.  A change in the seasons gives a whole different feel.

One of the many unique features of Chanticleer is the ingenious use of “hardscape” or architectural elements throughout the garden.  These elements are as important to my visits to the garden as the plants themselves.  They provide a dimension of experience not available in any other garden I have visited.  I have highlighted some of the hardscape in each of my posts, but here are additional examples:

The elegant gate at the entrance to the Teacup Garden.

Stone acorns in the Ruin Garden: Chanticleer has many beautiful stone sculptures, including the stone chair in my garden seating post, which has taken Pinterest, the online pinboard site, by storm.

Pattern in the floor of the Ruin Garden: at Chanticleer, it pays to look where you are walking because art is incorporated into the paths.  I have been inspired by my visits to add design elements to  my own woodland paths.

Lovely bridge with carved wooden railing below the Pond Garden.

Elegant bridge marking the entrance to the Asian Woods.

This creepy fountain of sunken marble faces is in a secluded alcove of the Ruin Garden—I love it!

I thought you might like to see close up photos of all the sunken marble faces in the Ruin Garden fountain.

My latest visit to Chanticleer was on October 21, shortly before the garden closed for the season at the beginning of November.  I was captivated by a small garden between the Teacup Garden and the back gate.  So much work had been put into the plantings and the seating arrangement to ornament the very short period when Chanticleer is open in the fall.  The eggplant-colored chairs perfectly echo the October-blooming and -fruiting beautyberries, toad-lilies, and other flowers behind them—now that’s attention to detail and that’s what Chanticleer is all about.

To finish out this series, I will need to visit Chanticleer in winter.  Because they don’t reopen until April 1, I hope to get special permission to visit off season.  Wish me luck!

I am currently putting together a Carolyn’s Shade Gardens 2012 Calendar featuring some of my favorite photographs from the past year.  If I am successful, look for an announcement here–it will make a great holiday gift.

Carolyn

Notes: Every word that appears in orange on my blog is a link that you can click for more information.  If you want to return to my blog’s homepage to access the sidebar information (catalogues, previous articles, etc.) or to subscribe to my blog, just click here.


Nursery Happenings:
The nursery is closed for the year.  Look for the snowdrop catalogue (snowdrops are available mail order) in January 2012 and an exciting new hellebore offering in February 2012.  If you are within visiting distance and would like to receive catalogues and information about customer events, please send your full name and phone number to carolynsshadegardens@verizon.net.  Subscribing to my blog does not sign you up to receive this information.

Chanticleer Part 2: Garden Seating

Posted in garden to visit, landscape design with tags , on August 8, 2011 by Carolyn @ Carolyns Shade Gardens

Carolyn’s Shade Gardens is a retail nursery located in Bryn Mawr, PA, specializing in showy, colorful, and unusual plants for shade.  The only plants that we ship are snowdrops and miniature hostas.  For catalogues and announcements of events, please send your full name, location, and phone number (for back up use only) to carolyn@carolynsshadegardens.com.  Click here to get to the home page of our website for catalogues and information about our nursery and to subscribe to our blog.

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Chanticleer, near ruinA grouping of chairs in the Chanticleer garden.

Chanticleer is a very unique and intimate place in Wayne, Pennsylvania, U.S., that calls itself “A Pleasure Garden”.  In my April article of that title, I explained why that moniker perfectly describes Chanticleer.   It is a garden designed by individuals who are both artists and plantspeople.   Every plant in the garden is  placed there not only for its pleasing horticultural attributes, but also as an object in the overall design for color and pattern and to provoke a feeling or reaction in the onlooker.  Although this is a serious garden, whimsy and the element of surprise are important considerations.  And the attention to detail is amazing.

A stone armchair evocative of the Flintstones near the Ruin Garden.

Matching sofa

Stone remote

When I revisited Chanticleer recently, I realized that I could help readers understand just how unique this garden is by focusing on one element: garden seating.  In fact, no other aspect of the garden demonstrates more clearly the complex thought process that must go into each of Chanticleer’s design decisions.  Garden seating is not just for sitting, in fact, it may be primarily for viewing.  It is used to evoke feelings in the viewer, of coolness in the heat, of enclosure in open spaces, of grandeur, of restfulness, of mirth, of tradition.  It draws the eye, completes a vignette, moves you through the garden, or slows you down.  It is integrated in the landscape in a way I have never seen anywhere else.

The seating on the porch of the Chanticleer House is very traditional.  It feels as if the Rosengarten family is just around the corner.

Chanticleer has inspired me over the years to add more thoughtful resting places to my own garden and to think of every element of the garden as important, not just the plants.  I hope you too will take away some good ideas as we walk around Chanticleer together trying out the seating (and the water fountains because I love them too!).

The plantings around this bench in the entrance garden change through the year.  When I visited, they were tropical.

A sliding bench in the shade of an elaborate arbor in the Tennis Court Garden.

The seating at Chanticleer is often colorful.

It can even match the flowers.

Whimsical bench in the Vegetable Garden.

Water fountain on the path to the Ruin Garden, far right.

Detail of water fountain, incorporating the oak leaf theme of the Ruin Garden.

I feel cooler just looking at these chairs across a sea of shimmering grass below the Ruin Garden.

This secluded bench in Minder Woods is a work of art.

Overlooking the Pond Garden is a large flagstone terrace covered by an arbor sheltering shady seating–very popular on Friday evenings in summer when Chanticleer is open late for picnics.

Pond Garden

A side path in the Asian woods brings you to this seating area–there is always an elegant arrangement in the vase.

Behind this area, also in the Asian Woods, is a bamboo forest, and the chairs incorporate the motif.  The stone flower sunk in the path inspired me to place similar features at the junctures of my woodland paths.

Simple benches on the porch of the restroom in the Asian woods.

My children loved to watch the water snake out of the stone trough attached to this water fountain near the Asian Woods.

A totally different feeling is evoked by these more traditional porch chairs along the paved path up to the Chanticleer House, almost like a grandstand from which to view the action instead of retreat from it.

This photograph and the following five are all of different kinds of seating around the Chanticleer House.

The view from the rocking chairs–so peaceful.

Traditional wicker chairs near the Teacup Garden reflect the tropical feel.

Water fountain in the Teacup Garden.

Bench in secluded alcove near the Teacup Garden.

Bench in entrance area to Teacup Garden.

If you are thinking of incorporating seating into your garden, Chanticleer is the place to visit for ideas.  From simple to elaborate, from traditional to whimsical, Chanticleer has it all.

Carolyn

Notes: Every word that appears in orange on my blog is a link that you can click for more information.  If you want to return to my website’s homepage to access the sidebar information (catalogues, previous articles, etc.), just click here.

Nursery Happenings: The nursery is closed until it cools off in the fall around the middle of September.  If you are on my customer email list, look for an email.  If not, sign up by sending an email to carolynsshadegardens@verizon.net with your name and phone number.

Chanticleer Part 1: A Pleasure Garden

Posted in garden to visit, landscape design with tags on April 20, 2011 by Carolyn @ Carolyns Shade Gardens

Carolyn’s Shade Gardens is a retail nursery located in Bryn Mawr, PA, specializing in showy, colorful, and unusual plants for shade.  The only plants that we ship are snowdrops and miniature hostas.  For catalogues and announcements of events, please send your full name, location, and phone number (for back up use only) to carolyn@carolynsshadegardens.com.  Click here to get to the home page of our website for catalogues and information about our nursery and to subscribe to our blog.

Asian mayapple, Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’

I recently visited the gardens at Chanticleer in Wayne, Pennsylvania, U.S., with garden bloggers from out of town.  In March, I went with Jill from Landscape Lover’s Blog, and on Sunday, I returned with Jean from Jean’s Garden and Jan from Thanks for Today.  Although I visit Chanticleer frequently, looking at the gardens through their eyes gave me a renewed appreciation for just how magical and amazing it is.

March color at Chanticleer, clockwise from upper left: paperbush, Edgeworthia chrysantha; Iris species; Sedum ‘Angelina’; spring-blooming hardy cyclamen, Cyclamen coum

Chanticleer calls itself “A Pleasure Garden” and that title perfectly reflects the unique feeling the garden conveys.  Although it is open to the public, it has an intimacy found only in a garden designed by individuals who are both artists and plantspeople.   Plants are used for their pleasing horticultural attributes, but also as objects in design for color and pattern.  Serious garden elements abound, but whimsy and the element of surprise are just as important.  I have been going to Chanticleer since it opened to the public in 1993, and I have never left without numerous ideas for my own gardens.

More March color at Chanticleer, clockwise from upper left: Iris species; Amur adonis, Adonis amurensis; twin-leaf squill, Scilla biflolia; Kuma bamboo grass, Sasa veitchii

Chanticleer was the country estate of pharmaceutical magnate Adolph Rosengarten and his wife Christine.  The Rosengartens built the original house in 1913 and hired landscape architect Thomas Sears to design the terraces surrounding it.  Additional homes were built for their children in the 1930s.  Adoph’s son left the 35 acre property to the public in 1990, and it opened to visitors in 1993.

March view from the Gravel Garden towards the Serpentine Garden showing the willows being trained and woven to resemble ancient olive trees.

The same view as above in April showing the beds that will be filled with a single annual plant to achieve the serpentine pattern visible from several vantage points in the garden.

Although Chanticleer has many amazing features, the primary attraction for me, and something I find unique to this garden, is the incredible attention to detail both in the big picture (see two photos above) and also in the smallest elements (see top photo).  Although you read this about gardens all the time, Chanticleer takes the concept to heights never approached by any public garden I have ever visited.  To give you a sense of the thoughtfulness displayed throughout the garden, I have decided to organize my photos starting with landscape shots and ending with individual plants, from macro to micro.  In doing this, I hope to convey a feeling for what Chanticleer has to offer.

The long views and big picture landscape design at Chanticleer are gorgeous:

The Gravel Garden contains plants that like hot, dry, Mediterranean conditions, and they are allowed to self-seed to give it a natural unkempt look to link it to the adjoining Ruin Garden.

At this time of year, you can see the “bones” of the Pond Garden, which will shortly be obscured by flowers.

Looking back up the hill from the pond area towards the Ruin and Gravel Gardens.

Back terrace of the Chanticleer house

View from the front terrace of the house to Minder Woods.

Individual gardens are equally as enchanting:

The entrance courtyard garden is filled with colorful annuals and bulbs.

The Teacup Garden is always changing.  Right now it is planted with edible plants, including the different lettuces above used to make blocks of color.

The Gravel Garden extends out to the hill below the ruin and is filled with unusual bulbs.

Spring flowers in the Pond Garden

The gravel in the front courtyard of the Chanticleer house is raked daily to produce a circular pattern, this time of year overlayed with falling cherry blossoms.

The containers at Chanticleer are spectacular:

Entrance courtyard

Teacup Garden

Plantings in the railings leading to the Tennis Court Garden

Some containers display a single plant to perfection, Asian mayapple, Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’.

The artistic elements are very unique, from hardscape to furniture to sculptures:

Marble heads immersed in water in the Ruin Garden

Minimalist containers in the Teacup Garden

Stone pear in the Pond Garden

Each individual plant is grown and displayed to perfection:

Katsura tree, Cercidiphyllum japonicum, in the Cut Flower Garden

Royal fern, Osmunda regalis, in the Pond Garden

Chanticleer is one of the few gardens I visit where I find shade perennials that I can’t ID.  Jean and Jan stumped me with this one: Chloranthus japonicus (no common name) in the Asian Woods

Another plant that stumped me: thick stemmed wood fern, Dryopteris crassirhizoma, in the Asian Woods.  Thanks to Lisa Roper, section gardener for the Asian Woods, for the ID.

Chinese redbud, Cercis chinensis, along the walk from the parking lot

I have tried to give you a sense of how unique this garden is.  I hope to return to Chanticleer monthly and write articles every other month featuring its gardens as they progress through the seasons.  For now I leave you with a photo of my two new friends:

Jean (on the left) and Jan under a winterhazel, Corylopsis, with cameras in hand, of course.

Goodbye for now, Chanticleer, it was indeed a pleasure!

Carolyn

Notes: Every word that appears in orange on my blog is a link that you can click for more information.  If you want to return to my blog’s homepage to access the sidebar information (catalogues, previous articles, etc.), just click here.  I have added Chanticleer to my sidebar under Places to Visit so you will always know where to find it.

Nursery Happenings: My second annual Great Hosta Blowout is going on right now.  For details, click here.  Look for Carolyn’s Shade Gardens at the Bryn Mawr Farmer’s Market on Saturday, May 7, from 9 am to 1 pm .

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